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(Source: nevver, via grumpyspacetoad)

policymic:


The UN calls America’s treatment of #homeless cruel, inhuman and degrading

"Cruel, inhuman and degrading." These are words you often associate with third-world countries, war zones or even off-the-book sites like Guantanamo Bay. You probably wouldn’t expect to hear those words applied to park benches, subway stations and empty stairwells in cities across America.
But that’s exactly what the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights argued in a recently released and damning periodic report on the state of human rights in the U.S. Though the report covered everything from the death penalty and gun violence to drones and rendition, the most eye-catching section was the UN’s condemnation of the criminalization of homelessness in the U.S, which “raises concerns of discrimination and cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment”
Read more | Follow policymic

policymic:

The UN calls America’s treatment of #homeless cruel, inhuman and degrading

"Cruel, inhuman and degrading." These are words you often associate with third-world countries, war zones or even off-the-book sites like Guantanamo Bay. You probably wouldn’t expect to hear those words applied to park benches, subway stations and empty stairwells in cities across America.

But that’s exactly what the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights argued in a recently released and damning periodic report on the state of human rights in the U.S. Though the report covered everything from the death penalty and gun violence to drones and rendition, the most eye-catching section was the UN’s condemnation of the criminalization of homelessness in the U.S, which “raises concerns of discrimination and cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment”

Read more | Follow policymic

(via cognitivedissonance)

"same."

(Source: lilacarly, via almightybob)

anarcho-queer:


Fact: 5.3 million African American men are denied the right to vote based on a past felony conviction.
That means more than 13% of the general African American population (39 mil) and 28% of the male African American population (18.5 mil) are prohibited from voting.
—  Ten Facts About The Racist Criminal Justice System
Felony Disenfranchisement is highest in the former slave states and states with a history of civil rights violations like Florida and North Carolina. Today’s red states—particularly in the bible belt—where the Republican voting base is strongest, appear to have vested racist and political interests in permanently separating Black people from their right to vote.
This link provides information on each state’s voting laws for those with a felony record.

anarcho-queer:

Fact: 5.3 million African American men are denied the right to vote based on a past felony conviction.

That means more than 13% of the general African American population (39 mil) and 28% of the male African American population (18.5 mil) are prohibited from voting.

—  Ten Facts About The Racist Criminal Justice System

Felony Disenfranchisement is highest in the former slave states and states with a history of civil rights violations like Florida and North Carolina. Today’s red states—particularly in the bible belt—where the Republican voting base is strongest, appear to have vested racist and political interests in permanently separating Black people from their right to vote.

This link provides information on each state’s voting laws for those with a felony record.

(via cognitivedissonance)

"

In one study, participants were asked to rank the humor in various cartoon captions. Half of the captions had been written by men, and half by women. When not told who wrote what, the participants judged them almost equally funny. In fact, based on the scores given in this experiment, men are just 2.2 percent more likely to be funny than women. Yet 90 percent of the participants agreed with the stereotype that men are funnier. Talk about a mind-bogglingly huge difference in perception versus reality.

And it gets weirder — when the participants were asked which gender they thought wrote a caption, the funnier ones were almost always assumed to be by men and the less funny ones by women. This might be expected, considering their stated bias. Even when told the name and gender of the person who wrote each caption, within a short time the participants started misattributing the funny ones to men. In other words, even when they knew that women had written some of the funniest captions, the bias that men are funnier was so ingrained that it made them misremember who had written what.

"

4 Ways We’re Programmed to Think Women Aren’t Funny by Kathy Benjamin (via bestoffates)

(via cognitivedissonance)

*84

tuneyards:

Hi TUNE-YARDS friends,

Another short note today, because we happily present the first song from the new album, Nikki Nack.

It’s called “Water Fountain.”

If you dig it like we do, you can preorder the album, here:

tUnE-yArDs Store

4AD

iTunes

Amazon

Also check to see if we’re playing near you soon.  We’re rehearsing hard, for you!

Thank you so much for being out there.  

Sincerely,

Merrill / tUnE-yArDs

ilosttrackofmymoralcode:

Comic: Adventure Time - Seeing Red (Kaboom)

(via socialistexan)

thepeoplesrecord:


Michelle Alexander: White men get rich from legal pot, black men stay in prisonMarch 14, 2014
Ever since Colorado and Washington made the unprecedented move to legalize recreational pot last year, excitement and stories of unfettered success have billowed into the air. Colorado’s marijuana tax revenue far exceeded expectations, bringing a whopping $185 million to the state and tourists are lining up to taste the budding culture (pun intended). Several other states are now looking to follow suit and legalize. 
But the ramifications of this momentous shift are left unaddressed. When you flick on the TV to a segment about the flowering pot market in Colorado, you’ll find that the faces of the movement are primarily white and male. Meanwhile, many of the more than  210,000 people who were arrested for marijuana possession in Colorado between 1986 and 2010 according to a report from the Marijuana Arrest Research Project, remain behind bars. Thousands of black men and boys still sit in prisons for possession of the very plant that’s making those white guys on TV rich.
“In many ways the imagery doesn’t sit right,” said Michelle Alexander, associate professor of law at Ohio State University and author of  The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness in a  public conversation on March 6 with Asha Bandele of the  Drug Policy Alliance.  “Here are white men poised to run big marijuana businesses, dreaming of cashing in big—big money, big businesses selling weed—after 40 years of impoverished black kids getting prison time for selling weed, and their families and futures destroyed. Now, white men are planning to get rich doing precisely the same thing?”
Alexander said she is “thrilled” that Colorado and Washington have legalized pot and that Washington D.C. decriminalized possession of small amounts earlier this month. But she said she’s noticed “warning signs” of a troubling trend emerging in the pot legalization movement: Whites—men in particular—are the face of the movement, and the emerging pot industry. (A recent In These Times article titled “ The Unbearable Whiteness of Marijuana Legalization,” summarize this trend.)
Alexander said for 40 years poor communities of color have experienced the wrath of the war on drugs.
“Black men and boys” have been the target of the war on drugs’ racist policies—stopped, frisked and disturbed—“often before they’re old enough to vote,” she said. Those youths are arrested most often for nonviolent first offenses that would go ignored in middle-class white neighborhoods.
“We arrest these kids at young ages, saddle them with criminal records, throw them in cages, and then release them into a parallel social universe in which the very civil and human rights supposedly won in the Civil Rights movement no longer apply to them for the rest of their lives,” she said. “They can be discriminated against [when it comes to] employment, housing, access to education, public benefits. They’re locked into a permanent second-class status for life. And we’ve done this in precisely the communities that were most in need of our support.”
As Asha Bandele of DPA pointed out during the conversation, the U.S. has 5% of the world’s population and 25% of the world’s prisoners. Today, 2.2 million people are in prison or jail and 7.7 million are under the control of the criminal justice system, with African American boys and men—and now women—making up a disproportionate number of those imprisoned.
Alexander’s book was published four years ago and spent 75 weeks on the New York Timesbestseller list, helping to bring mass incarceration to the forefront of the national discussion.
Alexander said over the last four years, as she’s been traveling from state to state speaking to audiences from prisons to universities about her book, she’s witnessed an “awakening.” More and more people are talking about mass incarceration, racism and the war on drugs.
Full article

thepeoplesrecord:

Michelle Alexander: White men get rich from legal pot, black men stay in prison
March 14, 2014

Ever since Colorado and Washington made the unprecedented move to legalize recreational pot last year, excitement and stories of unfettered success have billowed into the air. Colorado’s marijuana tax revenue far exceeded expectations, bringing a whopping $185 million to the state and tourists are lining up to taste the budding culture (pun intended). Several other states are now looking to follow suit and legalize. 

But the ramifications of this momentous shift are left unaddressed. When you flick on the TV to a segment about the flowering pot market in Colorado, you’ll find that the faces of the movement are primarily white and male. Meanwhile, many of the more than  210,000 people who were arrested for marijuana possession in Colorado between 1986 and 2010 according to a report from the Marijuana Arrest Research Project, remain behind bars. Thousands of black men and boys still sit in prisons for possession of the very plant that’s making those white guys on TV rich.

“In many ways the imagery doesn’t sit right,” said Michelle Alexander, associate professor of law at Ohio State University and author of  The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness in a  public conversation on March 6 with Asha Bandele of the  Drug Policy Alliance.  “Here are white men poised to run big marijuana businesses, dreaming of cashing in big—big money, big businesses selling weed—after 40 years of impoverished black kids getting prison time for selling weed, and their families and futures destroyed. Now, white men are planning to get rich doing precisely the same thing?”

Alexander said she is “thrilled” that Colorado and Washington have legalized pot and that Washington D.C. decriminalized possession of small amounts earlier this month. But she said she’s noticed “warning signs” of a troubling trend emerging in the pot legalization movement: Whites—men in particular—are the face of the movement, and the emerging pot industry. (A recent In These Times article titled “ The Unbearable Whiteness of Marijuana Legalization,” summarize this trend.)

Alexander said for 40 years poor communities of color have experienced the wrath of the war on drugs.

“Black men and boys” have been the target of the war on drugs’ racist policies—stopped, frisked and disturbed—“often before they’re old enough to vote,” she said. Those youths are arrested most often for nonviolent first offenses that would go ignored in middle-class white neighborhoods.

“We arrest these kids at young ages, saddle them with criminal records, throw them in cages, and then release them into a parallel social universe in which the very civil and human rights supposedly won in the Civil Rights movement no longer apply to them for the rest of their lives,” she said. “They can be discriminated against [when it comes to] employment, housing, access to education, public benefits. They’re locked into a permanent second-class status for life. And we’ve done this in precisely the communities that were most in need of our support.”

As Asha Bandele of DPA pointed out during the conversation, the U.S. has 5% of the world’s population and 25% of the world’s prisoners. Today, 2.2 million people are in prison or jail and 7.7 million are under the control of the criminal justice system, with African American boys and men—and now women—making up a disproportionate number of those imprisoned.

Alexander’s book was published four years ago and spent 75 weeks on the New York Timesbestseller list, helping to bring mass incarceration to the forefront of the national discussion.

Alexander said over the last four years, as she’s been traveling from state to state speaking to audiences from prisons to universities about her book, she’s witnessed an “awakening.” More and more people are talking about mass incarceration, racism and the war on drugs.

Full article

(via afrometaphysics)

mollyalicehoy:

Basically every conversation I had this past week.

mollyalicehoy:

Basically every conversation I had this past week.

*3

anewbody:

Dan Deacon - True Thrush (Official Music Video) (by Domino Recording Co.)

Just like human history, this video quickly devolves into a celebration of garbage.